It has been a little while since the latest edition of The Scottish Mountaineer was published along with my debut book reviews. It is a wonderful feeling to see your words in print on the glossy pages of a magazine and I hope that I will get the chance to do so again.  Members of the Moutaineering Council of Scotland automatically receive a copy of the magazine as part of their subscription. Non-members are able to purchase copies in newsagents in Scotland but I am unsure of its availability elsewhere.

I have posted the two reviews that appear in the last edition. As I have a small pile of walking related books for Christmas a few adhoc reviews will appear on the blog in the New Year.

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The results of a dilemma

I have been expanding my book collection over the last week with a pile of walking books. So imagine my dilemma when I received some unexpected Amazon vouchers earlier this week. What should I buy from the myriad of walking books on offer? Should I opt for some of the excellent photographic books available with stunning images of the British countryside and its fascinating flora and fauna? What about some practical books, perhaps some field guides that will help identify some of the flora and fauna? I would like to know more about the trees I pass or the butterflies flitting from flower to flower.

In the end, I opted for the following three books to join my ever expanding and unmanageable library of books. This library only ever seems to grow despite my attempts at thinning it.

The Grahams (A Guide to Scotland’s 2,000ft peaks)

Andrew Dempster. Published by Mainstream Publishing

I didn’t buy this because I have any desire to "tick" the 224 Grahams but as a useful reference book for many hills that you cross or pass on your way to ticking off all the Munros and Corbetts.

White River

Jamie Whittle. Published by Sandstone Press

This is a newly published book that has received excellent reviews for this debut author. It details a trek along the River Findhorn from the mouth to the source and then the return journey by kayak. It appeals to me because I know the area well having lived in Morayshire for a few years.

Scotland’s Far West – Walks on Mull and Ardnamurchan

Denis Brook and Phil Hinchcliffe. Published by Cicerone

The Ardnamurchan Peninsula is only a short car ride and ferry journey away from where I live. I have visited many times but seem to spend most of the time in a car rather than walking. The two walks I have done, to the Corbett – Garbh Bheinn and to the Silver Sands are both excellent. I wanted to explore this quiet, remote area of the West Coast and this book will give me the perfect excuse.

The books all arrived this morning and already I have been skimming through them, dipping in here and there. Book reviews will follow.